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Visual Development Is Not For Everyone
3 min read

Visual Development Is Not For Everyone

Visual development is the act of building digital experiences using a visual interface and no code. But is it for you? Let's find out!

Visual development encompasses building everything from apps, bots, and websites to automated workflows, integrations, and data visualizations. For the sake of simplicity, let’s refer to these as digital experiences.

Just like the half-decade old notion that everybody should learn to code, the no-code frontmen are doing everything they can to establish a notion that everybody should learn visual development, or in other words, learn to build without code.

A ton of people are jumping on the bandwagon either due to the shiny object syndrome or FOMO, others are doing it for a multitude of reasons.

We all know that herd-mentality does nobody any good. Time is the most valuable commodity we have and before embarking on anything new, it is only wise to assess whether it is a good investment of your time or not.

It is established that visual development is the act of building digital experiences using a visual interface and no code.

However, before delving deeper into all the moving parts of visual development, it is important for you to know the answers to the following questions:

  • Is visual development for me?
  • Is it worth my time to learn visual development?
  • Will learning visual development help me meet my career goals?

Exercise 1

The following exercise will help you answer the questions above.

Is visual development for me?

If you say yes to at least 3 of the following statements, it is safe to assume that visual development is for you.

  1. I am comfortable using online tools and don’t struggle when trying a new one. [Y/N]
  2. I really enjoy trying out new online tools. [Y/N]
  3. I don’t need hand-holding at every step of learning something new. [Y/N]
  4. Finding solutions to problems come to me naturally. [Y/N]
  5. I have a lot of patience and roadblocks don’t frustrate me easily. [Y/N]

If visual development is not for you, fret not, there is no shortage of things to do or careers to pursue.

Is it worth my time to learn visual development?

If you say yes to any one of the following statements, it certainly is.

  1. I am unemployed and looking to acquire valuable skills. [Y/N]
  2. I feel stuck in my job and wish to break into the tech industry. [Y/N]
  3. I wish to automate the manual aspects of running a business. [Y/N]
  4. I work in tech and want to level up my automation skills. [Y/N]
  5. I need to build internal tools without relying on developers. [Y/N]

Will learning visual development help me meet my career goals?

If you say yes to any one of the following statements, it certainly will.  

  1. I wish to become an automation expert.
  2. I want to launch an online side project with little to no investment.
  3. I want to build an MVP to test my idea for a web/mobile app.
  4. I am a designer who wants to build functional websites.
  5. I want to offer integration and automation services.
  6. I want to build apps and tools for a living.
  7. I aspire to work for a no-code company.
  8. I want to offer services to no-code companies.

Exercise 2

By now you should know if visual development is for you or not. But if you’re still unsure, take a look at the following statements.

  • I am a business owner who wants to build a website, web app, or mobile app for my own business.

If true, learning visual development is not worth your time. You’d be better off focusing on your core business and hiring an expert for the task above.

  • I want to build something and get rich quickly.

You’d be fooling yourself if you think you can.

  • I know many visual developers who are doing well for themselves so why can’t I?

You sure can, but this shouldn’t be the reason to pursue anything new.

Conclusion

The goal of the above exercises was to help you understand your real motivation behind learning visual development and by no means dissuade you from doing so.

I sincerely hope that it has given you some clarity regarding the prerequisites as well as the outcome of becoming a visual developer.

Needless to say that there could be many other reasons for one to learn something and no list or exercise can cover them all. Moreover, learning a valuable skill does no harm, and might just be a stepping stone towards a lucrative career in a related field.

So what’s the verdict? I am @iCanAutomate on Twitter and would love to know!

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